SUPERWILDVISION Black Forest

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Working on the picture

A camera and computer – this simple connection led to the invention of the webcam nearly 25 years ago. Today, it is almost an integral part of our everyday lives. Their continuous use delivers films and images in an almost serial output format. At this point, the webcam forms the basis for Irene Müller's factory canon. webcams found randomly on the Internet and their pictorial material serve as the basis and sketches for the painterly implementation on canvas – thus resulting from anonymous digital individual images analogue painterly originals. The digitally found footage is abstracted, recomposed and reinterpreted. The work on the image thus leads to a contextual examination at the intersection of photography and painting.

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SUPERWILDVISION Black Forest

The starting point of the project was 700 photos, which was provided by a wild camera of a hunter in the Black Forest. Inspired by these photos, Irene Müller's painting "Square Hhorse" was created.  She placed this image on a so-called church, which is based on scientific findings about the visual perception of wild boars. From April to June 2014, several infrared cameras provided countless photos and footage of this location, from the nocturnal parallel world of the Black Forest. This pictorial found footage led to a serial implementation on canvas and video work.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UgclyB4hzF4
https://irene-mueller.com/superwildvision-stuttgart-sued
https://irene-mueller.com/superwildvision-alpen

Inspired by these video recordings, an implementation in painting takes place on an ongoing basis.